Leading the Way on D-Day

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. was the only General officer to come ashore during the early hours of the D-Day landings. Crippled by arthritis and battling heart disease, Roosevelt overcame his physical obstacles to lead the troops onto Utah beach. He was awarded the Medal of Honor, though did not live to receive it, he succumbed toContinue reading “Leading the Way on D-Day”

Blood and Sand: “The Longest Day” (1962)

Originally posted on CHANDLER SWAIN REVIEWS:
    Darryl F. Zanuck’s monumental war epic depicting the events of the D-Day invasion of World War 2 has the disadvantage of not only following dozens of characters over dozens of different locations, but also the input of three different credited directors working to patch a cohesive picture…

Historical Revision in Perspective

At the heart of historical revisionism is distrust… a lack of faith in previous interpretations of the historical record.  This blog has bitterly observed the crass consumerism and intellectual vanity that often drive outlandish revisions in our history.  But, a closer examination reveals the true divide between revisionist and traditionalist- trust. As historians rush toContinue reading “Historical Revision in Perspective”