Hamilton Predicted Trump’s Rise

Alexander Hamilton predicted the rise of a President like Donald Trump-  He describes Trump perfectly when warning his countrymen about he dangers of Aaron Burr. “The expectation, I know, is, that if Mr. _____ shall owe his elevation to the (Republican) party he will judge it his interest to adhere to that party… and thatContinue reading “Hamilton Predicted Trump’s Rise”

Jefferson to Wasington- Free Press

Thomas Jefferson cautioned George Washington about the importance of a free press…. his words should serve as warning to citizens today… “No government ought to be without censors, and where the press is free, no one ever will. If virtuous, it need not fear the fair operation of attack and defense. Nature has given toContinue reading “Jefferson to Wasington- Free Press”

Madison and State Legislatures

James Madison observed following Shays’s Rebellion in 1786: “It is said that…a great proportion of the offenders choose rather to risk the consequences of their treason, than to submit to the conditions annexed to the amnesty; that they not only appear openly on public occasions, but distinguish themselves by badges of their character; and thatContinue reading “Madison and State Legislatures”

Not the Party of Eisenhower

Would Dwight D. Eisenhower be welcomed in today’s Republican party?… Today’s GOP- dominated by fiscal Conservatives like the so-called “freedom caucus;” scrawny descendants of Do-Nothings of the 80th Congress who obstruct, protest, and bloviate over the slightest Federal spending. The insistence on labeling government programs as “entitlements” will give these rank amateurs undue influence inContinue reading “Not the Party of Eisenhower”

Censure of a President- The Senate’s Voice

Whig opposition to President Andrew Jackson did not have enough votes in the House of Representatives to impeach Jackson for his Constitutionally suspect attacks on the Second Bank of the United States. Jackson’s rival, Senator Henry Clay took matters into his own hands and censured Jackson’s conduct in the Senate. “Resolved that the President inContinue reading “Censure of a President- The Senate’s Voice”

Lincoln and Majority Rule

Abraham Lincoln succinctly explained the insanity of secession in his First Inaugural Address. The majority rules in our democratic-republic. Failure to accept this is not patriotism, it is anarchy. “From questions of this class spring all our constitutional controversies, and we divide upon them into majorities and minorities. If the minority will not acquiesce, theContinue reading “Lincoln and Majority Rule”

Presidential Campaign Scandals in History

John Quincy Adams was in trouble… in his reelection bid in 1828.  Andrew Jackson built a nationwide network of support during Adams’ term in office.  Jackson’s campaign structure was the first of its kind and by 1828 there were pro-Jackson committees in every state.  All property requirements for voting had been removed, drastically increasing the electorate. Continue reading “Presidential Campaign Scandals in History”

Presidential Election Upsets Ranked

Many Presidential elections are decided… long before the votes are cast.  Technology makes predicting election results an acceptable part of the modern campaign cycle.  Historical analysis provides election scorecards on races prior to modern media technology.  Despite all the prognostication, there are several key elections which defied expectations. 5.  1892–  Grover Cleveland became the firstContinue reading “Presidential Election Upsets Ranked”

Selective Historical Outrage, Part 2

Academic historians like Kevin Kruse and Manisha Sihna take to social media to criticize the current President.  There is merit in using history to critically analyze current events. Their analysis begins to fall apart when they bemoan the manner in which Donald Trump was elected. Like many “progressive” intellectuals they despise the electoral system andContinue reading “Selective Historical Outrage, Part 2”

Echoes of Zachary Taylor

General Zachary Taylor was playing it cool… during the campaign of 1848.  Both political parties of the day were seeking his candidacy, but he was not willing to commit; “It is to me a matter of perfect indifference whether I am even elected [as president] or not. I do not intend any party shall useContinue reading “Echoes of Zachary Taylor”